Trekking: A lesson in getting what we paid for

You'll spend three days and two nights in the jungle in the National Park. The first night will be a village home stay, where you'll spend time with locals and eat local food. The next night you'll build your own camp out of materials we will find in the jungle. Your meals of sticky rice will be supplemented with food we collect in the jungle.

I'm in northern Laos, eating up whatever rubbish the trekking salesman behind the counter feels like telling us. Seated next to me are badass Israeli girls Amit, Bar, and Dal, and Dutch dude, Jelte. As I watched the girls negotiate our trekking cost in half (Israeli style!), I immediately knew I liked them. Jelte and I had already bonded in our van ride from hell on the way there (mountain roads + 95 degree heat + pissed off driver - aircon  = all the bad things). So I knew he was down for adventure too. 

And we did have adventure. That adventure meant the surreal feeling of having someone shake your hand, saying 'Hello, I am Namthee, welcome to my village.' It meant a lovely night playing sweet village kids, doing cartwheels, playing wheelbarrow and teaching them hand claps. Words not necessary. And it meant bonding with my new friends, playing dumb games, slipping down muddy river beds, and getting drunk serious over the bonfire. It meant watching our guide make a water bong out of bamboo and tap out beats while making up quirky songs in broken English. 

But other times it meant joining up with another group of 10 trekkers on thin trails, heads to butts style, so our pace slowed significantly. And it meant only going into the National Park when we begged, and even then being snuck in to the edge of it, as we learned our guides hadn't paid the entrance fee. And most importantly for me, it meant not getting to collect our own food or build our own camp, since the language barrier made it no doubt easier for the guides to do it on their own. 

Even still, my memories of this trek are warm. I grew close with the other trekkers, as you do when you are in a make-the-best-of-it type of situation. And besides, its impossible not to respect a guide who can make a water bong out of bamboo. 

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